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Egyptian Burial Chambers Projects

Hamaroby's Tomb by Robby

Hamaroby is buried in the Valley of the Kings in the tomb next to King Tut. Hamaroby was a great ruler. He took care of his wife and son. He liked hunting with a knife or a bow and arrow. He would kill a leopard and he would invite all his servants to eat with his family. After they were done eating the king himself would cut off the leopard's skin. He had one of his servants make a robe out of the skin. The king gave the robe to his son, Hamaroby II, and told him it was from the God, Thoth. Three years later the king died and his son took over and became one of the greatest Pharoahs like Ramses II. Thirty years later, Hamaroby II died and the robe was buried with him and he became a God.

The Things in the Tomb
There are four canopic jars for the stomach, liver, lungs, and intestines. There is a basket of apples, jewelry, cologne, wine bottles, clothing and his stuffed pet bird that represents Thoth, God of Wisdom.

The Tomb of Neveriza by Liza

My Egyptian person is named Neveriza. She was the daughter of a Pharaoh whose name was Nikwe. Neveriza was a high priestess in the temple of Isis. She trained the temple celebrants. She had two brothers. The older one inherited the throne, his name was Tutanwe.

The Things In The Tomb
Neveriza got to design her own tomb. On one side she put three of the grandsons of Isis, the sons of Horus: Qebsenuef, Imseti and Hapi. There were four sons but she didn't like the fourth very much, who knows why, and did not want his image on the wall (She did use all four sons of Horus, as her canopic jars.) Beside the three gods she had artists record a story about the Goddesss Isis and her four grandchildren. On another wall she depicted her two brothers along with herself and their fater. On the third side she recorded her father's funeral celebration. On the last side she depicted the mourners, whom she had trained, celebrating her mother's funeral.

In her tomb she put two canisters of sacred oil, her leopard throne, two shelves that stored her sacred objects as a priestess, a boat to carry her to the afterlife and a huyge sculpture of a cobra (the cobra is the symbol on Isis's crown.)

The Tomb of Tarsemissu by Noni

Tarsemissu was an Egyptian woman. She was a mother of 8 children. Her husband's name was Shysimo. Taremissu worked for Ramses II. She stored the food surplus. She lived for 32 years and died a natural death.

The Things In The Tomb
The walls of this tomb contain stories of Tarsemissu and Shysimos, her husband's life. The four canopic jars hold the insides of Tansemissu. The items I chose for her after life are: Three pigs to eat. One duck also to eat. A bowl and a spoon to eat from. One canoe for fishing and traveling. One statue of a person to be a slave and one live snake as a pet.

In her tomb she put two canisters of sacred oil, her leopard throne, two shelves that stored her sacred objects as a priestess, a boat to carry her to the afterlife and a huyge sculpture of a cobra (the cobra is the symbol on Isis's crown.)

The Tomb of Mara Keleanvarapth by Natalie

Mara Keleanvarapth is buried in this chamber. She was a wife to Kondred Kaleanvarapth, and had one son, who was named Kaleded, after her great uncle. She and her husband were wealthy farmers, and she sometimes went to the market, where she was a market seller. She had a few relatives, but not so many that you couldn't count them.

The Things In The Tomb
The scenes on the walls of the tomb are of her heart being weighed against a feather, her asking the gods for a safe journey to the afterlife, a curse guarded by Anubis, and two more goddesses, Shu and Geb, guarding the tomb itself.

 

Table of Contents > Ancient Egypt

 

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CTCWeb Resources
Early Man

Mesopotamia

Ancient China

Ancient Greece

Ancient Rome

Maya/Inca

Ancient Africa

Middle Ages

Knowledge Builders
Ancient Greek Animals, Music & Dance and more.

Teachers' Companions
Ancient Greek Animals, Music & Dance and more.

Other Resources
Mysteries of Egypt

Egyptian Art and Archaeology

The Art of the Fake

Global Glossary Terms
- Alexander the Great
- Caesar
- Ptolemy
- Caligula
- Cleopatra
- Medea

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